Category Irish Food Traditions

You’ll find great recipes in the Irish dishes and Irish drinks sections, but the concept of food in the Irish psyche is much larger than just the traditional recipes we hand down. A truly abundant land that produces a range of foodstuffs but has experiences great famine and a very particular relationship with food.This section is given over to exploration of the cultural and historical aspects of Irish cuisine.

Expect reflective pieces on the Irish approach to Irish food an drink. But there’ll be lighter social commentary, too. And like all we do at Irish Buzz, we’ll do it askew.A humorous, genuinely humanly approach is bound to prevail. Because if we can’t poke fun on a subject like inserting edible cellular material into a hole in our face, pray tell what’s the point of it all? Food is fun! And we are here to poke.

And sometimes you just can’t stand contrived nonsense. Check out our take on the Great Tart vs. Pie Debate to see what we’re getting at. Or the complimentary Irish Apple Cake Parlor Game helping you to keep from dying from aural consumption of bland conversation at your next coffee and cake meetup.

On the historical side, get set for insightful articles on the role food has played in the Irish context. These will cover lighter topics such as the deep-rooted, Celtic love of the pig – ‘the little man who pays the rent’. But there’ll also be in-depth articles on Irish food history, such as how it came about that for several centuries the potato became synonymous with sustaining life in Ireland.

Take a trip with us into the heart of an ancient people with us as we delve into the food traditions of the Irish Isle. Traditions that prevail in and guide Irish eating (and drinking) habits even this very day.

Irish Flag Shot

Irish flag shot
A delicious layer shot that looks great – like the Irish flag! And just like the tricolor currently serving as the disputed version of Ireland’s flag, you get to choose what color the ‘orange’ part. Grand Marnier, Brandy, Cointreau or Cognac is usually the preferred weapon of choice. But, as always, you are encouraged to get creative. Especially if it's St. Patrick's Day.